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Unlocking the Prophetic Mystery of the Feast of Tabernacles

Updated: Sep 24, 2021



In a few months, many Americans will be singing, “It's the most wonderful time of the year,” but for Israelis, the Feast of Tabernacles (or Sukkot), which is taking place right now, is the most joyous season of the Jewish calendar. Back in the days of the Temple, everyday tens of thousands of Jews packed into the old city of Jerusalem. One of the highlights of the day was the water libation—when water from the pool of Siloam in the city of David was carried up to the Temple. It was then poured out on the altar as the people prayed for rain (the winter rains in Israel begin in October).

At night, they would come out to rejoice for the Simchat bet ha Sho’evah (Joy of the place of drawing of water) ceremony. Regarding this event, there was a proverb in the Mishnah:[1]

“He that has not seen Simchat-bet-ha-Sho’ebah, the joy of the drawing (and the pouring) of the water has not seen joy in his life.”

The Feast of Tabernacles like the other mo’edim (appointed times of the Lord) has great prophetic significance. As I share in the video below, the Feast of Tabernacles points to:

1. The ingathering of the Jewish people back to the land of Israel;

2. The last great final harvest of souls;

3. The return of Yeshua and the setting up of his Messianic Kingdom;

4. The Jewish people recognizing that the one they rejected is their Messiah;

5. God forgiving their sin and bringing them into the age to come, the thousand year Messianic reign.

The Feast of Tabernacles is a celebration that will be observed by the entire world in the millennial Kingdom. Delegations from every nation will come to Jerusalem to worship the new king, Yeshua.

Then the survivors from all the nations that have attacked Jerusalem will go up year after year to worship the King, the Lord Almighty, and to celebrate the Festival of Tabernacles. (Zech. 14:16)

We wish you a very joyous Sukkot!

[1] The Mishnah is a compilation of the Oral Torah (Tradition) or what Yeshua called, the Tradition of the Elders.

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